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Tomorrowland

 
 

Category Albums Files
Astro Orbiter
2 34
Olszewski's Astro Orbiter


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31 files, last one added on Dec 23, 2007

Disneyland's Astro Orbiter


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3 files, last one added on Dec 26, 2009

 

2 albums on 1 page(s)

Monorail
2 9
Olszewski's Monorail


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9 files, last one added on Dec 06, 2009

Disneyland's Monorail



0 files

 

2 albums on 1 page(s)

Rocket to the MoonFrom opening day until September, 1967, the Moonliner rocket served as Tomorrowland's icon. Poised on its launch pad just outside the "Rocket to the Moon" attraction, the graceful and sleek lines of the spacecraft pointed directly to where mankind's future lay...space! The Moonliner rocket was designed by Imagineer John Hench with technical advice from pioneering rocket scientists Wernher Von Braun and Willy Ley. The actual structural engineering was done by Walter H. Preston, a friend of Mel Tilley who was Kaiser Aluminum's representative to Disneyland. The rocket was constructed with a steel frame but the outer skin was made from 3/16" aluminum (supplied by Kaiser Aluminum). Different sources cite an overall height between 76' and 80', however, blueprints specify a height of exactly 80'. The Moonliner stood proud and ready for adventurous space explorers (that's us!) to board for a thrilling trip to the moon and (hopefully) back. Interestingly, guests never actually "flew" aboard the Moonliner. Once inside the attraction, guests were directed to the flight cabins of either the "Star of Polaris" or the "Star of Antares." Once the mission was underway, the narration in both cabins always stated we were aboard the Star of Polaris! The Rocket to the Moon's initial sponsor, TWA, meant that for almost 7 years the Moonliner rocket stood resplendent in a very attractive red/white livery. In 1962, new sponsor, McDonnell Douglas, had the rocket re-painted to a blue/white with red "Douglas" lettering and the "Moonliner" name was replaced with "Douglas Rocket DC-78". In September of 1967, the attraction's name was changed to "Flight to the Moon". There was a major re-design of Tomorrowland that same year and while the attraction survived ( but in a new location) the Moonliner rocket did not: it was certified as completely destroyed on Sept. 13, 1967. For almost 32 years, the Moonliner was gone from Tomorrowland's frequently changing skyline, but in 1998, after another re-working of Tomorrowland, a scaled-down version of the Moonliner was placed over Redd Rockett's Pizza Port. This new Moonliner rocket was constructed using the same drawings as the original and stands about 40' high- a fine reminder of a former Tomorrowland attraction and mankind's race to space.
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Olszewski's Rocket to the Moon


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Released in July, 2008 for $59

6 files, last one added on Aug 25, 2008

Disneyland's Rocket to the Moon


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6 files, last one added on Dec 06, 2009

 

2 albums on 1 page(s)

Misc. Albums
1 14
Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage


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14 files, last one added on Aug 12, 2007

 

 

1 albums on 1 page(s)

69 files in 7 albums and 4 categories with 0 comments viewed 2689 times

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